Bedding plants

Hydrangea care - 4 little care tips

Pin
Send
Share
Send


Hydrangeas are a feast for the eyes, but also require some care. My personal tips for watering, fertilizing and cutting can be found here.

Ball hydrangea 'Bouquet Rose' - © Boris Stroujko - Fotolia.com

There is hardly a plant in German gardens that we can admire as often as hydrangea (hydrangea). No wonder, because hydrangeas impress with lush flowers in attractive colors and are comparatively easy to care for. If you are looking for a suitable embellishment for your garden, I can highly recommend hydrangeas. The special thing about the hydrangea, you can specifically influence the flower color. Before I go into the care of hydrangeas, I would like to introduce you to the biodiversity of hydrangeas.

content

  • 1 What types of hydrangeas are there?
    • 1.1 Garden hydrangea / hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
    • 1.2 panicle hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata)
    • 1.3 Plate hydrangea (Hydrangea serrata)
    • 1.4 Climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea petiolaris)
    • 1.5 Oak leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)
    • 1.6 Velvet hydrangea (Hydrangea sargentiana)
  • 2 hydrangea care - 4 tips
    • 2.1 Tip 1 - Water hydrangeas correctly
    • 2.2 Tip 2 - fertilize hydrangeas - when and how?
    • 2.3 Tip 3 - Prune Hydrangeas
    • 2.4 Tip 4 - Winter hydrangeas - How it works!
  • 3 A dream with good care: color change of the flowers

What types of hydrangeas are there?

As with almost all plants, there is a huge variety of species in hydrangeas. Here is a brief overview of the most popular types:

Garden hydrangea / hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)

© Carolin / stock.adobe.com
Garden hydrangea / hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla)
Bloom:June to September
Location:Sun to partial shade
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Flower bed, container planting, cut flower
"Show more pictures and data

Panicle Hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata)

© Spiroview Inc./ stock.adobe.com
Panicle Hydrangea (Hydrangea paniculata)
Bloom:July to October
Location:Sun to shadows
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Flower bed, group planting
"Show more pictures and data

Plate hydrangea (Hydrangea serrata)

© Zeitgugga6897 / stock.adobe.com
Plate hydrangea (Hydrangea serrata)
Bloom:July to October
Location:Sun to shadows
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Flower bed, container planting, cut flower
"Show more pictures and data

Climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea petiolaris)

© Axel Gutjahr / stock.adobe.com
Climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea petiolaris)
Bloom:June to July
Location:Sun to shade
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Trellis planting, wall greening
"Show more pictures and data

Oak leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)

© coulanges / stock.adobe.com
Oak leaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia)
Bloom:July to August
Location:Sun to shade
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Rebate planting, single position
"Show more pictures and data

Velvet Hydrangea (Hydrangea sargentiana)

© travelpeter / stock.adobe.com
Velvet Hydrangea (Hydrangea sargentiana)
Bloom:July to August
Location:Sun to partial shade
Ground:sandy to loamy
Use:Individual position, group planting, under planting
"Show more pictures and data

It is the growth habit, the many different colors and the shape of the flowers that make up the differences between the individual hydrangea species and their varieties.

Since each of them has its own needs, you should pay close attention to what you need to know about planting. For example, the soil and location must meet special requirements, with most hydrangeas feeling most comfortable in sunny to partially shaded places.

Hydrangea care - 4 tips

© maryviolet / stock.adobe.com As already mentioned, hydrangeas are fairly easy to care for, but you can't do without them. What you need to do and when depends mainly on the variety.

Tip 1 - water hydrangeas correctly

The most important thing in the care of hydrangeas is irrigation. Especially in dry and very warm weather, the soil must be kept moist (water in the morning and evening). Once the hydrangeas have dried out, the beauty is over.

  • When watering, make sure that there is no waterlogging, because the hydrangeas are also very sensitive to this.
  • This tip also applies to hydrangeas in pots or buckets, avoid standing water on the ground!
  • When watering the hydrangeas, take care that the flowers and leaves are not showered - risk of mildew!
  • The irrigation water for hydrangeas should not be calcareous, it is best to use rainwater, which also saves money.

Watering hydrangeas on vacation - 2 little tricks for self-watering

Not everyone has a nice neighbor who can take care of the hydrangeas while you are away. So that the hydrangeas don't dry out during your vacation, there are two simple tricks.

  1. Around Hydrangeas in the garden or bed To protect them from drying out, place a used vat near the plants. Drill tiny holes and fill the container with water - this way your hydrangeas are supplied with water drop by drop.
  2. For bucket hydrangeas there is a similar trick: instead of a tub, an empty PET bottle is used. Unscrew the lid, drill small holes, fill the bottle with water and screw the lid back on. Now put the simple self-irrigation system upside down in the flower pot, your plant will be watered little by little.

Tip 2 - fertilize hydrangeas - when and how?

Hydrangeas need fertilizer, making them no exception compared to other plants. But also here it depends on the variety, because not every hydrangea needs the same care. When buying, make sure you have a nitrogen-rich and low-phosphorus product. There are already special fertilizers for hydrangeas, but azalea or rhododendron fertilizers are also possible (both available from Amazon for less than 10 euros). I advise against blue grain fertilizer.

It is best to fertilize potted plants from March to August with liquid fertilizer. For planted specimens and container hydrangeas, I recommend long-term fertilizer in solid form. Fertilization takes place in spring and early summer.

Tip 3 - cut hydrangeas - does that have to be?

Hydrangeas don't really need to be pruned, but if the plants get too big, you have to use scissors. But be careful, if you cut too much, you risk that the hydrangea will no longer bloom. Almost all varieties are cut in spring. You can tell the exact time by the fact that the hydrangea is sprouting and the first buds can be seen. More in the video:

»Reading tip: Cut hydrangeas - This is how it's done

Tip 4 - overwinter hydrangeas - how it works!

Not all hydrangea varieties are hardy (be careful when buying them). This means that they have to be protected from frost, for example with garden fleece or brushwood. If you have the space, take the hydrangeas in and overwinter them at 5 - 8 ° C. From around February, the hydrangeas are then allowed to go back to a warmer place so that they can slowly sprout. Container plants can only survive winter in a sufficiently large container. The pot should be a good 30 to 40 cm in diameter. Here are some examples of hardy hydrangeas:

hardy varieties: hydrangeahardy varieties: plate hydrangea
You & Me hydrangeaBlue bird
Bouget roséLanarth White
Kluis SuperbaSantiago
OtaksaMirage

A dream with good care: color change of the flowers

© Elisabeth / stock.adobe.com With the already pretty plants, we can observe an impressive peculiarity with the necessary knowledge: depending on the nature of the soil, hydrangeas change the color of their flowers. The pH of the soil is decisive for the color. The flowers bloom blue on acidic soil, while pink on neutral soil.

Just try it yourself and influence the color of your hydrangeas. All you have to do is change the pH of the soil using aluminum sulfate. Add 2 tablespoons of the aluminum sulfate to the water and then be amazed at what happens.

Extra tip:

Once the hydrangeas in your garden are growing and thriving and you really like the color of the plants, you can grow them yourself later. You can find out how this works in our article: Multiply hydrangea.

Pin
Send
Share
Send