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Spinach nutritional values ​​- that's how healthy the vegetables are

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Spinach is absolutely delicious and healthy too. Not because it makes you as strong as Popeye, but because spinach contains a lot of iron. But what's still in the vegetables? We tell you.

Spinach is a welcome vegetable in the kitchen. Whether as a salad, main course or side dish - it can be prepared in a variety of ways on the menu.

In previous years, spinach was portrayed as being particularly rich in iron. It is now clear, however, that this is a calculation error with scientific figures. How exactly the error came about can no longer be proven today. Spinach does not contain excessive iron, but it does contain more than other vegetables.

Still, spinach isn't the best iron supplier. Vegetables only contain divalent iron, in which only a few percent (approx. 4 - 8 percent) can really be absorbed by the body. The body can absorb and utilize 20 to 25 percent of animal foods containing trivalent iron.

In addition, spinach contains substances that further inhibit iron absorption. The culprit here is called oxalic acid. So it is important to eat spinach in conjunction with foods that reduce oxalic acid. These include, for example:

  • broccoli
  • tomatoes
  • potatoes
  • peppers
  • Grapefruit

Cooking spinach can also help reduce the amount of oxalic acid. But spinach doesn't just contain iron, vitamin C, beta carotene, potassium and magnesium also ensure a balanced nutrient level.

Nutritional informationPer 100 grams
calories21 kcal
fatcontains traces
carbohydrates1.2 g
minerals
sodium70 mg
potassium550 mg
calcium120 mg
magnesium60 mg
phosphorus45 mg
iron3.4 mg
zinc0.6 mg
vitamins
Beta-carotene4800 ㎍
Vitamin E.1.4 mg
Vitamin B10.09 mg
Vitamin B20.20 mg
Vitamin B60.22 mg
Fohlsäure145 ㎍
vitamin C50 mg

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